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Appointments to National Organizations
Maria Baer, MD
Maria Baer, MD
Ivana Gojo, MD
Ivana Gojo, MD

Maria Baer, MD, professor, department of medicine and program in oncology, will serve as the principal investigator of the Myeloproliferative Disorders Research Consortium (MPD-RC) at the University of Maryland, while Ivana Gojo, MD, associate professor, and Saul Yanovich, MD, professor, both from the department of medicine and program in oncology, will serve as co-investigators. The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center has become a member of the MPD-RC, an international, multi-institutional non-profit consortium funded by the National Cancer Institute and set up to coordinate, facilitate and perform basic and clinical research investigating the genetic and cellular mechanisms of the Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative disorders. Two MPD-RC clinical trials have been opened at the University of Maryland: A phase I/I trial of the JAK2 inhibitor CEP-701 (Lestaurtinib) in myelofibrosis, and a phase II study of fludarabine-based conditioning for allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelofibrosis.

Claudia Baquet, MD, MPH, professor, department of medicine, and associate dean for policy and planning, was appointed by the director of the National Cancer Institute as a member of subcommittee H, clinical group for a term ending June 30, 2013. Baquet was selected due to her demonstrated competence evidenced by the quality of her research accomplishments, publications in scientific journals and other achievements and honors. Subcommittees make recommendations to the National Cancer Advisory Board and survey the status of research in their respective fields of science.

Carol Carraccio, MD, MA, professor, department of pediatrics, was selected by the Federation of Pediatric Organizations (FOPO) as its director of the initiative for innovation in pediatric education. FOPO noted that Carraccio brings an impressive resume in graduate medical education and is an innovative educator. This appointment, which began in May 2009, also recognizes her contributions to the development of the learning portfolio for the accreditation council for graduate medical education.

Richard Eckert, PhD
Richard Eckert, PhD
Mary McKenna, PhD
Mary McKenna, PhD

Debra Counts, MD, associate professor, department of pediatrics, was elected to continue as a member of the executive committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Endocrinology. Her new term began in November 2009 and will extend through the close of 2012. Counts’ appointment was in recognition of her efforts toward the section on endocrinology’s mission of educating pediatricians.

Richard Eckert, PhD, professor and chair, department of biochemistry & molecular biology, was elected to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Public Affairs Advisory Committee for 2009.

Mary McKenna, PhD, associate professor, department of pediatrics, has been appointed as a handling editor for reviews for the Journal of Neurochemistry. Appointees are selected based on their international recognition for expertise in the field of brain energy metabolism and neurochemistry as well as experience as an editor. McKenna will serve a two-year appointment.

Scott M. Thompson, PhD, professor, department of physiology, has been appointed as a member of the board of scientific counselors for the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism for the term July 1, 2009, to June 30, 2013.

                          Awards & Honors

Amber Beitelshees, PharmD, MPH, assistant professor, department of medicine, received the 2009 American College of Clinical Pharmacy Cardiology Practice Research Network Junior Investigator Award. This award recognizes outstanding early career research in the area of cardiovascular pharmacotherapy.

Misbah Khan, MD, MPH, clinical professor, department of pediatrics, was presented with a lifetime achievement award from the Maryland Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics at their annual awards dinner in Baltimore in September 2009. She was honored with this well-deserved award because of her tireless dedication and devotion to the children of Maryland.

Department of Medicine Occupational Health Program was recently designated a World Health Organization Collaborating Center in Occupational Health. This designation recognizes existing collaborations in capacity building and expert consultations on occupational health topics requested by the Americas Ministries of Health and provided by collaborating center partners. In June 2009, Joanna Gaitens, PhD, MSN, MPH, assistant professor, department of medicine, and Melissa McDiarmid, MD, MPH, professor, department of medicine, and director, occupational health program, provided training to healthcare leaders in Georgetown, Guyana, on hospital hazards and preparation for pandemic influenza at the invitation of the Guyanese Ministry of Health.

Elijah Saunders, ’60, professor, department of medicine, received the living legend award from Associated Black Charities (ABC). He was recognized at ABC’s annual fundraising gala, held in Baltimore in June 2009, for his philanthropic contributions to the field of medicine.

                            Events, Lectures & Workshops
Nana S. Amiridze, MD, PhD
Nana S. Amiridze, MD, PhD
Angela Brodie, PhD
Angela Brodie, PhD
Joana Carneiro da Silva, PhD
Joana Carneiro da Silva, PhD
Steven J. Czinn, MD
Steven J. Czinn, MD
Amy M. Fulton, PhD
Amy M. Fulton, PhD
Katia Kontrogianni-
Konstantopoulos, PhD
Katia Kontrogianni-
Konstantopoulos, PhD
Christopher Plowe, MD, MPH
Christopher Plowe, MD, MPH
Nana S. Amiridze, MD, PhD
 
Yen-Pei Christy Chang, PhD
Yen-Pei Christy Chang, PhD
Michael Donnenberg, MD
Michael Donnenberg, MD
 
 
Raj Shekhar, PhD
Raj Shekhar, PhD

Nana S. Amiridze, MD, PhD, assistant professor, department of diagnostic radiology & nuclear medicine, and Ribal S. Darwish, MD, assistant professor, department of anesthesiology, presented “Hemodynamic Instability and Asystole during Treatment of Intracranial Dural AVF and CCF with Onyx” at the 10th Congress of the World Federation of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology in Montreal, Canada, in June 2009. At the same congress, Amiridze and Darwish were among the presenters of “Brain Perfusion Abnormalities in Patients with Compromised Venous Outflow.”

Angela Brodie, PhD, professor, department of pharmacology & experimental therapeutics and program in oncology, gave a plenary lecture entitled “Aromatase and Breast Cancer” at the Endocrine Society 2009 annual meeting in Washington, DC, in June 2009.

Kenneth H. Butler, DO, associate professor, department of emergency medicine, was an invited speaker at the Third International Congress of the Polish Society for Emergency Medicine, held in Wroclaw, Poland, in June 2009. He served as course director for the pre-conference advanced airway management course and presented a lecture on rapid-sequence intubation.

Joana Carneiro da Silva, PhD, assistant professor, department of microbiology & immunology and institute for genome sciences, presented a lecture entitled “Apicomplexan Parasites: A Model System for Disease and for Evolutionary Genomics” at the Gordon Research Conference on Evolutionary & Ecological Functional Genomics, in Tilton, N.H., in July 2009.

Yen-Pei Christy Chang, PhD, assistant professor, department of medicine, was an invited speaker, presenting her findings on STK39, a novel hypertension susceptibility gene, at the Institute of Biomedical Sciences Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan, in March 2009, and for the department of human genetics at the University of Michigan and the 2009 World Congress of Nephrology in Milan, Italy, in May 2009.

Steven J. Czinn, MD, professor and chair, department of pediatrics, was the invited plenary session speaker at the 15th International Workshop on Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Related Organisms (CHRO) held in Toki Messe, Japan, in September 2009. He presented “Vaccine Development to Prevent or Eradicate H.pylori Infection: An Update.”

Michael Donnenberg, MD, professor, Department of Medicine, presented “Enteropathogenic E. coli EspF and the Mitochondrial Death Pathway” at the 109th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Philadelphia in May 2009.

Amy M. Fulton, PhD, professor, department of pathology, gave a presentation entitled “Alternative Strategies to Target the COX-2 Pathway to Prevent Cancer Metastasis” during the cancer/tumor invasion and metastasis and drug discovery session at the Second Annual World Cancer Conference held in Beijing, China, in June 2009. The international conference focused on the latest advancements in cancer treatment and research and featured speakers from around the world to address current issues in cancer, from basic research to clinical therapy.

Katia Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, PhD, assistant professor, department of biochemistry & molecular biology, presented “Obscurin: A Muscle Giant That Regulates Sarcomere and Membrane Assembly” at the American Society for Cell Biology 48th Annual Meeting for the Special Interest Group Muscle Cytoskeletal Protein Assembly in Normal and Diseased Muscles in December 2008 in San Francisco. In addition, she presented “HAX-1: A Multifaceted Protein with Emerging Roles in Ca Cycling, Apoptosis and Cardiac Function” at the International Society for Heart Research Meeting in Baltimore in May 2009.

Ping Lei, PhD, graduate research assistant, Fred M. Moeslein, MD, assistant professor, and Raj Shekhar, PhD, associate professor, all from the department of diagnostic radiology & nuclear medicine, reported on “Real-time Tracking of Liver Motion and Deformation Using Fine Needle” at the International Congress and Exhibition on Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery in Berlin, Germany, in June 2009. At the same meeting, Shekhar discussed a poster presentation entitled “An Image Registration-based Approach for Continuous Volumetric CT-guided Interventions” which he had co-authored.

Kevin D. Pereira, MD, MS, professor, department of otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery, was an invited speaker, presenting “Tracheostomy in Pre-term Infants,” at the International Federation of Otolaryngology Societies, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in June 2009.

Christopher Plowe, MD, MPH, professor, department of medicine and center for vaccine development, participated in the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) consultation with the outside community on developing clinical research infrastructure for infectious diseases: 2010-2020, in Bethesda, Md., in July 2009. This consultation convened some of NIAID’s most experienced advisors and key staff to examine critical issues relevant to clinical research infrastructure, and to consider which models for funding and conducting clinical research best meet NIAID’s goals for the next decade. In addition, Plowe presented “Vaccine-Resistant Malaria” at the Seattle Biomedical Research Institute in Seattle in July 2009.

Eliot L. Siegel, MD, professor, department of diagnostic radiology & nuclear medicine, delivered the AGFA Mayneord Lecture on “Imaging Informatics: The Key to Success for the Future of Radiology” and a keynote lecture entitled “The Top Five Elements in Achieving a Full Clinical PACS” at the joint congress of the British Institute of Radiology, the College of Radiographers, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and the Royal College of Radiologists in Manchester, England, in June 2009. Siegel also moderated a session on his keynote lecture topic

                     Book/Textbook Publications
Richard Colgan, MD
Richard Colgan, MD
Steven C. Cunningham, MD
Steven C. Cunningham, MD
Kevin D. Pereira, MD, MS
Kevin D. Pereira, MD, MS
Elijah Saunders, ’60
Elijah Saunders, ’60

Richard Colgan, MD, associate professor, department of family & community medicine, authored Advice to the Young Physician: On the Art of Medicine, released in October 2009 by Springer Publishing. Colgan authored the book with the intent of revealing how to make the transition from technician to healer. He believes that the book would be a valuable supplemental reading to the medical student curriculum on medical humanism. The book has been favorably reviewed by medical educators, residents and students.

Steven C. Cunningham, MD, chief resident, department of surgery, wrote a children’s book of art and poetry entitled Dinosaur Name Poems, recently released by Three Conditions Press. Children ages four to 12 are the target audience for this richly illustrated, bilingual (English/Spanish) book, including an extensive illustrated glossary of technical terms and prehistoric creatures. It is notable for its historic correctness and has the rare distinction of being a Paleontological Research Institution-approved book. This designation was given to the book’s content and illustrations by noted author and paleontologist Dr. Richard A. Kissel, director of teacher programs at the Paleontological Research Institute and its Museum of the Earth in Ithaca, N.Y., who reviewed the book. Cunningham is also the author of multiple articles on medical nomenclature.

Linda Lewin, MD, clinical associate professor, department of pediatrics, published a manuscript “Improving Education in Primary Care: Development of an Online Curriculum Using the Blended Learning Model.”

Stuart E. Mirvis, MD, professor, Kathirkama Shanmuganathan, MD, professor, Lisa A. Miller, MD, assistant professor, and Clint W. Sliker, MD, assistant professor, all from the department of diagnostic radiology & nuclear medicine, authored Emergency Radiology, Case Review Series, published by Elsevier.

Kevin D. Pereira, MD, MS, professor, department of otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery, is co-editor of a newly-published textbook in pediatric otolaryngology entitled Pediatric Otolaryngology for the Clinician, a user-friendly resource for practicing general otolaryngologists, pediatricians, and family practice physicians.

Elijah Saunders, ’60, professor, department of medicine, contributed the foreword in Spirituality and Medicine, a book authored by G.F. Hodges and H.B. Belton and published by AuthorHouse in Bloomington, Indiana, in May 2009.

                    Grants & Contracts
Stephen B. Liggett, MD
Stephen B. Liggett, MD
A-Lien Lu-Chang, PhD
A-Lien Lu-Chang, PhD
Dudley K. Strickland, PhD
Dudley K. Strickland, PhD
Elijah Saunders, ’60
Bruce Greenwald, ’87
Bruce Greenwald, ’87
Gerald Wilson, PhD
Gerald Wilson, PhD
Aiping Zhao, MD
Aiping Zhao, MD
Iris Lindberg, PhD
Iris Lindberg, PhD
Myron Levine, MD
Myron Levine, MD
Kevin D. Pereira, MD, MS
Marcelo B. Sztein, MD
Marcelo B. Sztein, MD
Claire Fraser-Liggett, PhD
Claire Fraser-Liggett, PhD
Jeffrey A. Winkles, PhD
Jeffrey A. Winkles, PhD
Marcelo B. Sztein, MD

Stephen B. Liggett, MD, professor, departments of medicine and physiology, received a five-year $1.8 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for his work on the genomics of G-protein coupled receptor signaling in the lung. The title of his grant is “Basis of Variability of Lung GPCR Signaling.”

Iris Lindberg, PhD, professor, department of anatomy & neurobiology, received two grants from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases—a four-year $1.5 million R01 entitled “Control of Peptide Hormone Biosynthesis by PC2 and 7B2” and a two-year $412,000 R21 grant entitled “Identifying New Peptide Hormones.” In addition, Lindberg received a four-year $1.2 million from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for a Eureka project entitled “De-Orphanizing the Peptidome.”

A-Lien Lu-Chang, PhD, professor, department of biochemistry & molecular biology, received a five-year $1,377,045 research grant from the National Cancer Institute for her work entitled “Repair of Oxidatively Damaged Guanines.”

Myron Levine, MD, professor, department of medicine, and director, center for vaccine development, received a four-year $10,499,702 Gates Foundation Global Health Grant for his work entitled “Efficacy of Maternal Immunization with Influenza Vaccine in Preventing Influenza in Infants and Mothers in Mali, West Africa.” This award funds a project that proposes to provide quantitative information on the burden of influenza among pregnant women and young infants in Mali, West Africa, and on the potential benefits to mothers and their young infants that can be derived from immunizing women with influenza vaccines late in their pregnancy.

Dudley K. Strickland, PhD, professor, departments of surgery and physiology, and director, center for vascular and inflammatory diseases, received a five-year $1,875,000 grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for his work entitled “Regulation of Factor VIII Levels and Activity by Members of LDL Receptor Family.”

Marcelo B. Sztein, MD, professor, department of pediatrics and center for vaccine development, received a five-year $14,786,549 National Institutes of Health Research Project Cooperative Agreement (U19) entitled “Mucosal Immunity, Vaccines and Microbiota Interplay in Humans and Animal Models” to establish a cooperative center for translational research on human immunology and biodefense (CCHI) at Maryland. Research at the CCHI will focus on furthering our understanding of the protective immunological mechanisms that are elicited upon oral immunization in the gastrointestinal tract microenvironment. Moreover, the CCHI team of investigators will conduct pioneering studies on the interactions between the local intestinal microbiota and the host immunity following oral vaccination. Further goals of this grant involve the development of novel technologies to advance and accelerate vaccine development in humans. The award provides $2 million in direct costs per year and also involves Claire Fraser-Liggett, PhD, professor, department of medicine, and director, institute of genome sciences, Steven Czinn, MD, professor and chair, department of pediatrics, Alessio Fasano, MD, professor, department of pediatrics, and director, mucosal biology research center, Tom Blanchard, PhD, associate professor, department of pediatrics, and Bruce Greenwald, ’87, professor, department of medicine.

Gerald Wilson, PhD, associate professor, department of biochemistry & molecular biology, received a five-year $1,384,404 research grant from the National Cancer Institute for his work entitled “Mechanisms Directing Oncoprotein and Cytokine mRNA Decay.”

Jeffrey A. Winkles, PhD, professor, departments of surgery and physiology and center for vascular and inflammatory diseases, received a four-year $1,245,000 grant from the National Cancer Institute for his work entitled “TWEAK-Fn14 Signaling in the Tumor Microenvironment.” The first two years of this grant award are funded by the Obama administration’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Additionally, Winkles received a one-year $112,449 grant from the department of defense breast cancer research program for his work entitled “Targeted Therapy of Fn14-Positive Breast Tumors Using a TWEAK-Cytotoxin Fusion Protein or Noncovalent Complex” and a five-year $337,500 subcontract award as a co-investigator on a National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke grant entitled “TWEAK-induced Ischemic Neuronal Death.”

Aiping Zhao, MD, assistant professor, department of medicine and mucosal biology research center, received a five-year $1.1 million R01 grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for his project entitled “Novel Cytokine Regulation of Gut Function and Inflammation.”

* Grants & Contracts of $1 million and above

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